Tuesday, February 19, 2008

In other happy news...

...the University announced its tuition increase for 2008-2009: 4.8%, the lowest percentage since 1960. Now financial aid better go up to at least $75.5 million or I'm afraid that Joe Russo's claim of making things happen is just false. Actually I will think that anyway until our financial aid rivals that of our "aspirational peers."

6 comments:

Brian Boyd said...

I've heard a rumor that we decide how much to raise our tuition simply by taking the average cost of tuition at the 10 top schools in the country .. if THEY'RE worth that much money, then WE are, too!

But, yes, unlike Harvard, all our students whose parents make less than six figures are not going to school for free.

Anonymous said...

I've heard all sorts of things about the money that we give to the school, including some pretty shady stuff on the part of some people higher up on the pecking order. whether this is true or not is something else.

Tom said...

I still think Brad Duffy's post on college tuition increases explains it best. (Dec. 14, 2007)

Anonymous said...

Stanford's administration just decided to eliminate tuition for students whose parents earn less than $100,000/yr., apparently because it was beginning to draw undue attention to the fact that it has a $17 billion endowment but still carries an outrageous pricetag. I know that ND's endowment is only 1/3 that, but shouldn't we still be following behind our "aspirational peer"?

Anonymous said...

Maybe this is naive, but why is being a "top-tier" institution of utmost importance to Notre Dame. Being a Catholic scholar is hard enough; why do we make it more difficult by pretending to be a secular campus? Catholicism breeds Catholicism. It seems like our current practices are self-defeating. We complain about the lack of Catholic scholars? I see that we aren't doing anything about it.

Brandon said...

Being Catholic and being a top-tier institution are not mutually exclusive. If we had the 800 best Catholic scholars in the world on faculty our faculty would be as strong as any. Similarly, being Catholic does not mean we cannot have a naturally diverse campus, among mainstream Catholic universities Notre Dame lags in this respect despite the sincerest efforts of the admissions office.