Thursday, July 9, 2009

Love in Truth

The text is here.
A commentary guaranteed not to bore you is here.

I'm not qualified to comment on it, but do have one thought worth sharing.
I'm glad to see that we've had recent discussions going on, and am indebted to Nathancontramundi for the reminder that we missed a big one here. Interestingly, the very way the encyclical is written has an important reminder to those of us Catholics who are divided into warring camps:

Caritas in veritate is [also replete] with correlations of faith and reason, charity and knowledge, rights and duties, subsidiarity and solidarity, constantly reminding us of the Catholic "both-and."

This 'both-and' has been a critical part of my theology work lately. Is 'the Kingdom of Heaven' now or after death? It's already but not yet. Are we members of the City of God or the City of Man? Well, both, actually, and we have responsibilities to both. The person *and* the common good, the soul *and* the body, faith *and* works ..

But so long as divisions between us remain, Augustine reminds us 'in essentials, unity; in nonessentials, diversity; in all things, charity.' One of the things I've most gained from my time abroad has been seeing firsthand just how much 'social conservative Catholics' have to learn from 'social justice Catholics,' and vice versa -- as well as how much all of us, regardless of what labels we'll use for ourselves, have to learn from those we completely disagree with. (Pope John Paul the Great is said to have thought by taking each issue and examining it from every possible point of view, taking what can be learned from each and thereby ascending as if upon a spiral staircase, drawing closer to the Truth with each step. It's a frustrating and challenging way to go about things, but what worth having in life is easy?)

2 comments:

nathancontramundi said...

"just how much 'social conservative Catholics' have to learn from 'social justice Catholics,' and vice versa -- as well as how much all of us, regardless of what labels we'll use for ourselves, have to learn from those we completely disagree with."

Amen, Mr. Boyd, amen.

Thanks for getting some Caritas coverage here at the Rover!

Brian Boyd said...

I fully admit that sentences like that one can be frustratingly vague and seem wishy-washy, and there are times when dialogue can give way to spinelessness; but I think those times are few and far between, and I hope that The Rover will always have some voices that are more conciliatory and less combative. (That's why I think that Matt Smith and I were a good team the year before last, as we balanced each other out; but I'm biased.)

Thanks yourself, Nathan, for continuing to read The Rover even when you disagree with it. Honestly, while sometimes issues are put together at the last minute, I believe we have gotten better every year, and am especially optimistic about the direction of the paper for next year.